Portland bat controlBats are everywhere in the Portland Metro area.  Maybe it does not seem like it because you do not see them as often as other nuisance wildlife, like squirrels for example.  However, they make up 20% of mammals in the world, coming out to hunt and feed while we are tucking ourselves in bed at night.

Wildlife Removal Inspection Portland ORMost commonly in Portland and Vancouver, Little Brown Bats and Big Brown Bats live in the attics, gables and eaves of our homes while we sleep blissfully unaware.  Besides being on the “creepy” side, what harm can bats actually do?  Their feces or “guano” can pose a serious health risk, transmitting disease and it should not be handled without proper personal protective equipment.

Despite being on the creepy side and spreading disease, they do serve a purpose in our ecosystem.  Bats are beneficial by eating a significant amount of insect pests.  They can also pollinate and spread fruit seeds.

Bats can give birth one to three times a year and generally have just one pup.  Their young cannot fly until about 4 to 8 weeks and are dependent upon their mothers until that time.  Although they have a relatively slow reproduction rate, bats can live up to 20 years and have a huge population in Oregon and Washington.

What You Can Do:

Identify potential roosting areas around your home by looking for feces.  Bat feces look very similar to mice feces and will be directly below the roosting area, not spread out like mice droppings.  Do not attempt to clean bat droppings without proper equipment.

What We Can Do:

We understand bats, their behaviors and habitats.  Using this knowledge allows us to design and implement ways to block entry to attics and other nesting areas, encouraging them to seek shelter somewhere else.

If you have an issue with bats in or around your home and would like some help, please do not hesitate to give us a call.  We will happily take the time to answer any questions that you might have and provide advice and support.

 

Photo credit: Tambako the Jaguar / Foter / CC BY-ND